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EPPE 3-11
Publications

Department for Education
1997-2003 EPPE 2003-2008 EPPE 3-11 2007-2011 EPPSE 3-14 2008-2013 EPPSE 16+
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The EPPE 3-11 Project began on 1st April 2003.

The final report will be published in Autumn 2008.

For publications related to findings over the pre-school period and to the end of Key Stage1 (at 7 years old) see the EPPE Publications page.

Full list of publications covering the pre-school and primary stages of the project.
Full Publication List (65kB pdf file)


Tier 1
The Effectiveness of Primary Schools in England in Key Stage 2 for 2002, 2003 and 2004

Edward Melhuish, Helena Romaniuk, Pam Sammons, Kathy Sylva, Iram Siraj-Blatchford and Brenda Taggart (2006), The Effective Pre-School and Primary Education 3-11 Project (EPPE 3-11):The Effectiveness of Primary Schools in England in Key Stage 2 for 2002, 2003 and 2004. London: DfES / Institute of Education, University of London.

Abstract: This report covers children’s progress during Key Stage 2 in all primary schools in England over a 3-year period (2002-2004). Value added multilevel models are used to investigate children’s progress in Key Stage 2 by controlling for prior attainment, as well as several background influences. These analyses allow measurement of the extent to which children’s progress can be attributed to the primary school attended. Primary schools where children make significantly greater progress than predicted (on the basis of prior attainment and intake characteristics) can be viewed as more effective, and schools where children make less progress than predicted can be viewed as less
effective. The phrase effectiveness throughout this report refers to this measure of progress, not to any other characteristics or qualities of schools.


Tier 2
Influences on Children’s Attainment and Progress in Key Stage 2:  Cognitive Outcomes in Year 5

Pam Sammons, Kathy Sylva, Edward Melhuish, Iram Siraj-Blatchford, Brenda Taggart, Yvonne Grabbe and Sofka Barreau (2007), The Effective Pre-School and Primary Education 3-11 Project (EPPE 3-11): Influences on Children’s Attainment and Progress in Key Stage 2:  Cognitive Outcomes in Year 5. London: DfES / Institute of Education, University of London.

Abstract: This report presents the results of analyses related to the Key Stage 2 phase of a major longitudinal study investigating the influence of pre-school and primary school on children’s cognitive and social/behavioural development (EPPE 3-11) in England.  The study is funded by the Department for Education and Skills (DfES).  The focus of this report is on children’s cognitive attainments at the end of Year 5.  A report on children’s social/behavioural development at this age will be published separately (EPPE 3-11 Team., 2007 in press).  The original EPPE pre-school sample was recruited to the study at age 3 years plus and followed to the end of Key Stage 1 (Year 2) in primary school.  An additional ‘home’ sample of children (who had not attended pre-school) was recruited at the start of primary school.  The EPPE 3-11 project is following up the whole (the pre-school and ‘home’) sample to the end of primary schooling (age 11 years plus).  The research has adopted an educational effectiveness design and mixed methods approach (Sammons et al., 2005; Siraj-Blatchford et al., 2006) in order to investigate child, family and home influences on developmental outcomes, so that the relative importance of these influences can be studied in relation to the strength of pre-school and primary school factors. 


Tier 2
Influences on Children’s Attainment and Progress in Key Stage 2:  Social/behavioural Outcomes in Year 5

Pam Sammons, Kathy Sylva, Edward Melhuish, Iram Siraj-Blatchford, Brenda Taggart, Sofka Barreau and Yvonne Grabbe (2007), The Effective Pre-School and Primary Education 3-11 Project (EPPE 3-11): Influences on Children’s Development and Progress in Key Stage 2:  Social/ behavioural outcomes in Year 5. London: DfES / Institute of Education, University of London.

Abstract: This report presents the results of analyses related to the Key Stage 2 phase of a major longitudinal study investigating the influence of pre-school and primary school on children’s social/behavioural development (EPPE 3-11) in England.  The study is funded by the Department for Education and Skills (DfES).  The focus of this report is on children’s social/behavioural attainments at the end of Year 5.  A report on children’s cognitive development at this age, published separately (EPPE 3-11 Team., 2007).  The original EPPE pre-school sample was recruited to the study at age 3 years plus and followed to the end of Key Stage 1 (Year 2) in primary school.  An additional ‘home’ sample of children (who had not attended pre-school) was recruited at the start of primary school.  The EPPE 3-11 project is following up the whole (the pre-school and ‘home’) sample to the end of primary schooling (age 11 years plus).  The research has adopted an educational effectiveness design and mixed methods approach (Sammons et al., 2005; Siraj-Blatchford et al., 2006) in order to investigate child, family and home influences on developmental outcomes, so that the relative importance of these influences can be studied in relation to the strength of pre-school and primary school factors. 


Tier 2
Influences on Children’s Attainment and Progress in Key Stage 2: Cognitive Outcomes in Year 6

Pam Sammons, Kathy Sylva, Edward Melhuish, Iram Siraj-Blatchford, Brenda Taggart and Stephen Hunt (2008) The Effective Pre-School and Primary Education 3-11 Project (EPPE 3-11): Influences on Children’s Attainment and Progress in Key Stage 2: Cognitive Outcomes in Year 6; DfE/Institute of Education, University of London

Abstract: The report presents the results of analyses related to the primary school phase of a major longitudinal study investigating the influence of pre-school and primary school on children’s development (EPPE 3-11) in England. Specifically, this report is concerned with children’s cognitive attainments at the end of Year 6 when the children were aged eleven, and their academic progress from the age of seven to eleven: Key Stage 2. The findings also extend and develop the findings from previous earlier ages.


Tier 2
Influences on Children’s Attainment and Progress in Key Stage 2: Social/behavioural outcomes in Year 6

Pam Sammons, Kathy Sylva, Edward Melhuish, Iram Siraj-Blatchford, Brenda Taggart and Helena Jelicic (2008) The Effective Pre-School and Primary Education 3-11 Project (EPPE 3-11): Influences on Children’s Attainment and Progress in Key Stage 2: Social/behavioural Outcomes in Year 6; DfE/Institute of Education, University of London

Abstract: This report describes the results of analyses on children’s social/behavioural outcomes at the end of Key Stage 2 (i.e., at age 11 years) and investigates social/behavioural development across Key Stage 2 (from Year 2 to Year 6).


Tier 3
Variations in Teacher and Pupil Behaviours in Year 5 Classes

Pam Sammons, Brenda Taggart, Iram Siraj-Blatchford, Kathy Sylva, Edward Melhuish and Sofka Barreau (2006), The Effective Pre-School and Primary Education 3-11 Project (EPPE 3-11): Summary Report - Variations in Teacher and Pupil Behaviours in Year 5 Classes. London: DfES / Institute of Education, University of London.

Abstract: This report summarises the main findings from Tier 3 of the first analyses of classroom
processes, reported in detail in a longer paper (see Sammons et al., 2006). It presents results of the analysis and comparison of teacher’s and children’s behaviours in 125 primary school Year 5 classes during the Spring and Summer terms of 2004 and 2005 (Tier 3). The paper provides a description of the sample in terms of two observation instruments used to investigate teaching and learning. It explores the extent of variation between classes in different aspects of teachers’ practice and in children’s observed responses.
In addition, analyses exploring the associations between several measures of overall school quality and effectiveness, improvement, teaching and learning, and the classroom observation measures of teachers’ behaviour and children’s response are described. The quality indicators were matched from Ofsted inspection data and take the form of numeric rating scales based on inspectors’ professional judgements. Further analyses that links measures of school effectiveness, derived from the Tier 1 component of the research using national assessment data (Melhuish et al., 2006), are also described.


Tier 3
The Influences of School and Teaching Quality on Children’s Progress in Primary School

Pam Sammons, Kathy Sylva, Edward Melhuish, Iram Siraj-Blatchford, Brenda Taggart, Sofka Barreau and Yvonne Grabbe (2007) The Influences of School and Teaching Quality on Children’s Progress in Primary School. Research Report DfE RR07 DfE Publications Nottingham

Abstract: This report investigates the way school and classroom processes affect the cognitive progress and social/behavioural development of children between the ages of 6 (Year 1) and 10 (Year 5) in primary schools in England. This report describes the results of quantitative analyses based on a sub-sample of 1160 EPPE children across Year 1 to 5 of primary education. The research builds on the earlier analyses of children's Reading and Mathematics attainments and social/behavioural outcomes in Year 5 for the full EPPE 3-11 sample (see Sammons et al., 2007), by investigating relationships between children's outcomes and measures of classroom processes, collected through direct observation of Year 5 classes in 125 focal schools chosen from the larger EPPE 3-11 data set. The analyses also explore patterns of association between children's outcomes and broader measures of overall school characteristics derived from teacher questionnaires and Ofsted inspection reports for this sub-sample of schools.


Other Reports:

Tracking and mobility over the pre-school and primary school period: Evidence from EPPE 3-11

Edward Melhuish, Pam Sammons, Kathy Sylva, Brenda Taggart, Iram-Siraj-Blatchford, Stephen Hunt, Sofka Barreau and Wesley Welcomme (2008) Tracking and mobility over the pre-school and primary school period: Evidence from EPPE 3-11. Institute of Education, University of London

Abstract: This report describes the ‘tracking’ of the EPPE 3-11 sample and then goes on to examine the possible influence of mobility on EPPE 3-11 children’s cognitive progress and social/behavioural development over both the pre-school and primary school period. The EPPE 3-11 project recruited children from 141 pre-school settings in six English Local Authorities (LAs) at the age of 3+. The project then followed these children through their primary school careers until the end of KS2 in primary school (Year 6, age 11). By this point the EPPE 3-11 children were attending over 900 primary schools in over 100 English LAs. Tracking the EPPE 3-11 sample has been an on-going process which has not just taken place at the key points of transfer for children.


Relationships between pupils’ self-perceptions, views of primary school and their development in Year 5

Pam Sammons, Kathy Sylva, Edward Melhuish, Iram Siraj-Blatchford, Brenda Taggart,Helena Jelicic, Sofka Barreau, Yvonne Grabbe, Rebecca Smees (2008) Relationships between pupils’ self-perceptions, views of primary school and their development in Year 5. Institute of Education, University of London

Abstract: This research builds on earlier reports (Sammons et al., 2007) by investigating relationships between children’s outcomes in Year 5 and aspects of pupils’ self perceptions and their views of primary school, measured in Year 5 (age 10) and in Year 2 (age 7) of primary school, controlling for background characteristics. These measures have been derived from a self-report instrument completed by EPPE 3-11 children. The analyses explored associations between children’s progress and development over time and their self-perceptions and views of primary school.


Influences on pupils' self-perceptions in primary school: Enjoyment of school, Anxiety and Isolation, and Self-image in Year 5

Pam Sammons, Kathy Sylva, Iram Siraj-Blatchford, Brenda Taggart, Rebecca Smees and Edward Melhuish (2008) Influences on pupils' self-perceptions in primary school: Enjoyment of school, Anxiety and Isolation, and Self-image in Year 5. Institute of Education, University of London

Abstract: This report presents the results of analyses of pupils’ self-perceptions in primary school. It is part of the longitudinal Effective Pre-school and Primary Education 3-11 (EPPE 3-11) research project funded by the Department for Education (DfE).
The focus of this report is pupils’ self-perceptions in Year 5 (age 10) in four key areas:
‘Enjoyment of school’; ‘Academic self-image’; ‘Behavioural self-image’ and ‘Anxiety and
Isolation’. Reports on pupils’ cognitive and social/behavioural development at this age have been published separately (Sammons et al., 2007). Questionnaires were administered to children asking their views about school and classroom life. These provided measures of pupils’ self-perceptions in Year 2 and again in Year 5 in terms of ‘Enjoyment of school’, ‘Anxiety and Isolation’ and ‘Academic self-image’and ‘Behavioural self-image’. A range of statistical methods have been used to investigate results for 2520 pupils for whom at least one self-perception outcome measure was collected in Year 5.


Exploring pupils’ views of primary school in Year 5

Pam Sammons, Kathy Sylva, Iram Siraj-Blatchford, Brenda Taggart, Rebecca Smees and Edward Melhuish (2008) Exploring pupils’ views of primary school in Year 5. Institute of Education, University of London

Abstract: A range of information about pupils’ self-perceptions and views of their primary school were collected as part of the Effective Provision of Pre-school and Primary Education
(EPPE 3-11) Project. In Year 5 the ‘All About Me and My School’ questionnaire included information about pupils’ views of their primary school. A range of statistical methods has been used to investigate results for 2528 pupils for whom at least one pupils’ views of primary school outcome measure was collected in Year 5. Three measures of pupils’ views of primary school were identified from exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis of the questionnaire data and these measures have been further analysed in relation to a range of child, family and home learning environment (HLE) characteristics to explore whether certain groups of pupils have different views and experiences. In addition, analyses have been conducted to see whether pupils’ views of primary school are associated with variation in pupils’ other outcomes in Year 5.


Final report from the Primary Phase: Pre-school, School and Family Influences on children’s development during Key Stage 2 (7-11)

Kathy Sylva, Edward Melhuish, Pam Sammons, Iram Siraj-Blatchford and Brenda Taggart, (2008) Final Report from the Primary Phase: Pre-school, School and Family Influences on children’s development during Key Stage 2 (7-11) DfE RR 061 The Department for Education (DfE). Nottingham

Abstract: EPPE 3-11 is a large study of the developmental trajectories of approximately 2800 children in England from age 3 to 11 years. This is the final report of the primary school phase with a focus on Key Stage 2 (ages 7-11). Earlier parts of this study have focussed on pre-school. Many of the EPPE children leaving Key Stage 2 (at age 11) with confidence and armed with the skills they need to tackle learning in secondary school. However, some children moved onto secondary school with poor skills in key areas or with low self-image and aspiration. The EPPE 3-11 project set out to explain some of the reasons behind these different developmental trajectories. This final report begins with a brief background to the study. It goes on to describe the study’s design and the assessments used to create each child’s developmental trajectory between age 3 and 11 years. Individual, family and home learning environment (HLE) influences on pupils’ developmental outcomes at age 11 are explored as well as the educational influences of the primary school, showing how the academic effectiveness of each primary school is related to pupils’ outcomes. The influence of the primary school is also considered in relation to interactions with earlier pre-school effectiveness and quality. Later sections of the report ‘drill down’ into the pupils’ experiences of the classrooms and schools in which they learn, presenting findings on a sub-sample of 1160 EPPE 3-11 pupils in 125 schools in Year 5 classrooms (age 10). Observations and questionnaires were used to investigate educational practices that shape learning and development inside the classroom and the school, and show relationships with pupils’ development at age 10 and progress from Year 1 (age 6) to Year 5 (age 10).

Pupils’ self-reports and on the way they perceive their school and teachers is also considered. Pupils’ self-perceptions (e.g. how happy they are at school or how good they think they are at maths) are combined into key dimensions such as ‘Enjoyment of school’, ‘Academic self-image’ and ‘Behavioural self-image’, which are then linked to child and family characteristics and to developmental trajectories. In addition, resilient and vulnerable pathways are discussed using quantitative and case study methods. Positive (or ‘protective’) influences that can ameliorate risk factors in development, especially the role of family support for learning and pre-school education are identified. The report also includes information on ‘other’ influences on children’s outcomes such as neighbourhood, mobility, out of school hours learning, transitions to secondary school, and term of birth.


Final report: Effective Primary Pedagogical Strategies in English and Mathematics in Key Stage 2: A study of Year 5 classroom practice drawn from the EPPSE 3-16 longitudinal study.

Siraj-Blatchford, I., Shepherd, D-L., Melhuish, E., Taggart, B., Sammons, P. and Sylva. K. (2011) Effective Primary Pedagogical Strategies in English and Mathematics in Key Stage 2: A study of Year 5 classroom practice drawn from the EPPSE 3-16 longitudinal study. Department for Education. London

Abstract: This sub-study of the main EPPE 3-11 research explored the differences between poor, average and excellent teachers, through observation of teaching practice and links this to the effectiveness of their schools. This study reports on the analysis of observations conducted in 82 Year 5 classrooms which were originally observed during the Spring and Summer terms of 2004 and 2005. The report builds on previous reports on observations in Year 5 classrooms (Variations in Teachers and Pupil Behaviours DfES Report 817 and Influences of School and Teaching Quality on Children’s Progress in Primary School DCSF Report 028) by analysing the field notes of the observers to illuminate the pedagogical strategies that differentiate teachers in a range of schools.  The key findings report on the significant differences in the strategies used by teachers in excellent, good and poor schools. There is a ‘bundle’ of behaviours that, taken together, can make a difference to children’s development and progress and therefore their later life chances.

Photograph - in pre-school class

 

 
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July 11, 2013 © EPPSE 3-14 Project: Institute of Education